Dentistry for Kids in Ogden

When Should my Child First See the Dentist and Why?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests that kids see a dentist by age one.

This is around the age that children begin to have teeth and we want to help them get on the right path from the beginning. We can look for problems such as baby bottle tooth decay, teething irritations, gum disease and prolonged thumb-sucking, just to name a few. We can then provide special preventative care for your child.


How Do I Prepare My Child and Myself for the Visit?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests that kids see a dentist by age one.

This is around the age that children begin to have teeth and we want to help them get on the right path from the beginning. We can look for problems such as baby bottle tooth decay, teething irritations, gum disease and prolonged thumb-sucking, just to name a few. We can then provide special preventative care for your child.

What Will Happen on Their First Visit?

For very young children, often our first visit is an introductory ice-breaker to acquaint your child with Dr. Simkins and his staff. We have found that our calm, warm and fun environment is the key to a successful first visit. Short, successive visits are meant to build the child’s trust in our staff and can prove invaluable if your child needs to be treated later for any dental problem.

Appointments for your kids should be made early in the day when they are most alert. If your kids are under the age of two, a parent may need to sit with the child during the examination.

Children’s Preventative Care

Flouride

When used properly, fluoride is a safe and effective way to help reduce decay. Bacteria within the mouth create acid, which damages the tooth. Fluoride will help strengthen the tooth, which in turn will be more resistant to these acid attacks, creating a barrier for the tooth.

There are several different sources of fluoride. Your residential water may be a great source; check with us to see if it contains fluoride already. Otherwise, our office or your pediatrician at 6 months of age, can prescribe a fluoride supplement.

We recommend continuing these supplements until approximately 16 years of age. We also provide fluoride treatments at the office which are “painted on.” These topical treatments help strengthen the teeth in your child’s mouth. Fluoridated toothpaste, along with over-the-counter mouth rinses can also help as well. We will be more than happy to answer any questions, and help come up with a plan that best suits your child’s needs.

Bottles

Many babies use bottles on a daily basis, but should not use bottles all day. In fact, the American Medical Association recommends that kids don’t sleep with a bottle. When babies’ use of bottles is excessive, baby bottle decay can happen. Baby bottle decay is a preventable disease.

You can also prevent baby bottle decay by being careful about the fluids you put in your child’s bottle. Use fluids that will hydrate and build their bodies; try to stay away from sugary drinks, juices, and soda pop. Unfortunately, milk will also cause decay.

At the soonest age possible, your child should not have any liquids, besides water, after they have brushed their teeth before bed. As a parent/caregiver you can help fight against this disease and give your child a healthier life and smile.

Thumb sucking and pacifier use

Thumb sucking and pacifier use is very common in infants and toddlers. It is a natural reflex and a soothing tool they develop to calm themselves down. However, prolonged use can cause some issues.

Some of these issues include complications with the growth of their mouth, changes in the roof of their mouth, and/or alignment problems with their teeth. You should start weaning them off pacifiers around 18 months. Thumbsucking can present an even greater challenge. If at all possible, try to discourage thumbsucking from birth with socks on hands or pacifiers.

It’s easy to take a pacifier away, but not a thumb. If you have any questions or concerns regarding your child’s thumb sucking or pacifier use let us know.

Teething

Teething usually begins around six months. The 20 primary teeth typically continue to erupt until age 2-3. Some signs of teething are a decrease in appetite, irritation, fussiness, sleepless, and more drooling than usual. If any of these signs increase and/or your child is experiencing a fever, diarrhea, or a rash, consult your dentist or pediatrician. Some children’s gums get sore and tender during this process. To help soothe their gums, you can gently rub them with a clean finger, a wet gauze pad, or a small, cold spoon. A cold teething ring may also help. If none of these help, you can ask us for more options.

To schedule your child’s first visit with Castle Creek Pediatric Dentistry, give us a call at 801-590-7929. We proudly serve Ogden, Pleasant View, and Farr West, UT with child dental services.

For very young children, often our first visit is an introductory ice-breakers to acquaint your child with Dr. Simkins and his staff. We have found that our calm, warm and fun environment is the key to a successful first visit. Short, successive visits are meant to build the child’s trust in Dr. Simkins and his staff and can prove invaluable if your child needs to be treated later for any dental problem.

Appointments for children should always be scheduled earlier in the day, when your child is alert and fresh. For children under 2 years of age the parent may have to sit in the dental chair and hold the child during examination. After the first visit, parents may want to wait in the reception area so a relationship can be built between your child and our staff.